There’s a curious thing that happens in sobriety.

You discover yourself. Or rather, you remember yourself. You remember the state you were before the trauma and addiction and hiding. You remember the aliveness of the present moment.

For many, remembering feels like getting to know yourself for the first time. It’s what the Big Book of AA talks about when it mentions the miracle of sober living…

“We are not fighting it, neither are we avoiding temptation. We feel as though we had been placed in a position of neutrality — safe and protected. We have not even sworn off. Instead, the problem has been removed. It does not exist for us. We are neither cocky nor are we afraid. That is our experience. That is how we react so long as we keep in fit spiritual condition.”

Yes, sobriety can hold some uncertainties but what’s more, sobriety holds new possibilities you’ll discover as you reintegrate into life after sober living care.

In this article, you’ll discover key ways that sobriety is your pathway to having more fun, living out loud, and doing what makes you happy.

Connection

One thing you’ll discover in your sober journey is more connection.

Connection to others. Connection to the present moment and connection to yourself. You will notice that you feel things more deeply because you are fully aware of them. Unaltered by substances, you are able to observe your life from a place of curiosity. Emotions feel more vibrant. Both happiness and sadness and everything in between. 

In being in the present moment, you are also more able to control these emotions. You are better able to focus, remember important things, and make important decisions for your life. With more presence, you deepen your relationships and forge new pathways for enjoyment.

Boundaries

The word ‘boundaries’ can carry negative connotations, but it’s far from being a negative thing. For example, creativity and growth thrive within set boundaries. Without boundaries, there are too many things to choose from and it’s easy to become overwhelmed.

Studies into human cognitive development call this phenomenon, ‘decision fatigue’.  In sobriety, you discover where your boundaries are, what hurts, and what makes you most happy. You limit your exposure to things that no longer serve you and go after what does. 

You get to discover your self-care needs and you learn to seek out the resources for those needs. This opens the door to new possibilities because you have a baseline of personal necessity to choose from.

Confidence 

Integrating back into successful life after sober living carries with it the confidence that you can take on anything that comes your way. This feeling deepens as you learn to trust yourself more and continue to show up for yourself.

Becoming sober isn’t about living robotically and ignoring the negative voice on your shoulder. It’s about experiencing life in a newer, more fulfilling way.  And as you experience this life and take on challenges, you build more courage and strength for the long term. 

You find the confidence to be more honest with yourself and others and go to new places and start new hobbies. 

Spirituality 

For many, before sobriety, there was a sense of disconnection from everything around you and a hopelessness that it carried. You tried to control every situation with your addiction just to find your life slipping more and more out of your hands. When you become sober, you recognize that not only are you connected to something greater than yourself, but things are actively working in your favor. You discover that you don’t have to be in control of every outcome in order to feel safe or whole. 

As your relationship with your true self deepens, you feel more at peace in your daily life. You also feel more willing to accept that peace in your life and are open to both challenges and possibilities that come your way. 

Freedom 

Finally, what you’ll discover in sobriety, the neutrality that the AA quote alluded to, is freedom. Freedom to choose who you want to be, how you want to live your life, and the adventures you take on. 

You get to choose your environment, who your friends are and what things mean or don’t mean to you. You have the freedom to focus on what you’re gaining and redefining what old habits now mean to you. When you’re sober, you actually get to make progress on the things you always wanted to do.

Compassionate Living Is Sober Living 

Compassion is not complete if it does not include the self. On your sober living journey, you’ll discover new levels of compassion for yourself and others that were previously buried beneath self-doubt, shame, and guilt. You’ll discover that love has deeper roots than anything addiction could ever have. And you’ll discover your capacity for more love and patience with yourself and others as you grow in your healing.

At Bridgeway Sober Living, compassion and nurturing are our first approaches to helping you stay on track in your recovery journey. Our staff is excited to help you integrate into a successful life and discover the possibilities waiting for you. Click here to learn more about our sober living community.